Ten Tips for Better Firearms Training

Ten Tips for Better Firearms Training

 

These are great and not what you (I) would ordinarily expect! When I first saw the title of our underlying original article by Jim Grant I immediately thought about things like this:

 

“Squeeze, don’t pull.”

 

“Cheek smushed against the stock.”

 

“Pull back firmly, while holding her slightly down and left.”

 

And…

 

Basic safety rules, etc.

 

No, no, no. Jim’s advice is much more simple – brilliantly simple! He wrote up his recent range training experience for Guns.com, and a must read Article. Please read that. It is advice all shooters need to hear, regardless of level or experience.

 

And unlike so many of the lists we do here, this one isn’t the usual 1…2…3…blah… It’s a Top Ten Countdown! You’re going to love each one.

 

Sir Winston demonstrates nos. 7, 5, and 4. The cigar could be no. 11…

 

Drum roll, please … The top ten shooting course tips are:


  1. Snacks!

 

Yeah. Food. You see where this is going, huh? All common sense and too often overlooked.

 

If you’re out working for hours, the last thing you want is for the old blood sugar to crash. Pack some protein bars or Snickers (don’t be that … grumpy, crazy guy/gal from those commercials).

9. Sleep!

The average adult gets, needs rather, between 6 and 10 hours of sleep each night. That’s where the 8 hour average comes in. You may be over or under; whichever – just make sure you get the zzz’s. Then you’ll be wide awake and might actually hit something!

8. Hydration!

 

These are so easy, it hurts…

 

Unless you shoot inside at some posh facility, the odds are you’ll be sweating. Treat shooting work like any other sport of outdoor activity. It is that demanding. Drink plenty of water and consider adding in a sports drink.

 

Dehydration, even of the mild sort, will rapidly begin to affect mental and physical performance.

 

Lay off the coffee and the booze, please!

7. A lid

 

I had to look that up … it means a Hat.

 

Great advice for any outdoor sport and especially one that calls for good, clear vision. The hat … lid will keep the sun out of your eyes and off of your neck. Beat the heat, the glare, and maybe skin cancer.

6. Pouches/holsters/slings/etc.

Don’t be that jerk who leaves his stuff all over the place. No one likes a slob. Keep all the gear and ammo zipped up and out of the way – or right where you’ll need it.

 

And do not be “that guy” who walks around the range toting the gun. Some places prohibit the practice. Even if they don’t, regardless of how careful you are to keep the barrel up or down all the time, you might make someone nervous. And look silly too.


Number 5! Comfortable clothing and shoes

You’re not hunting or going into jungle combat. Dress the role. Remember that the more comfortable you are, the better you’ll shoot.

4. A familiar gun you like, that works!

Something you know is junk or a new piece you’ve never tested probably isn’t the thing to bring to a serious training course. Keep it comfortable and reliable.

 

And know that even the best guns running the best ammo sometimes jam. Clear it and forget it. Be cool and take it all in stride.

3. Electronic hearing protection


I have never used these items before – not even in a test. But they makes sense.

 

I shoot with muffs or plugs, the old school way. That’s fine for most occasions. But if you’re paying money for a course, you might want to hear what the instructor says. It might be important. The newer, better hearing options allow for normal communication, while blocking the high-decibel noises from the shoots.

 

You can hear while you save your hearing. With the lid…


  1. Ammo

Find out what they recommend and bring plenty of it. Have more than you need because you’ll frequently need more than you think. Bring it or pay “house” prices.

 

Run appropriate rounds for the stops and plates (no armor piercing rds, please). And buy the good stuff. This isn’t the time to try to save a nickle on the rounds no one has ever heard of. Quality will count here. Buy right, shoot right.

 

And. The NUMBER ONE tip for making the most of your firearms training is …

 

Keep an Open Mind.

 

Have fun. Try to learn something. And be considerate to everyone at all times.

 

Makes perfect sense.

 

Jim Grant came up with these super points after a trip to Front Sight in Nevada. If you’re out there, look ‘em up!

 

You’ve been really good through this list (and I really hope you liked them as much as I did), so here’s a Bonus! Check out this related information from the Weekend Prepper site: Getting Fit for the Firefight! Shooting is a sport so fitness counts.

 

Perrin​​ ​​Lovett​​​ ​​​writes​​ ​​about​​ ​​freedom,​​ ​​firearms,​​ ​​and​​ ​​cigars​​ ​​(and​​ ​​everything​​ ​​else)​​ ​​at www.perrinlovett.me​​.​​ ​​He​​ ​​is​​ ​​none​​ ​​too​​ ​​fond​​ ​​of​​ ​​government​​ ​​meddling.

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