Extreme Prepper Lessons are Coming out of Puerto Rico after Maria

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 Extreme Prepper Lessons are Coming out of Puerto Rico after Maria

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Harvey, Irma, and Maria – America has been hit hard this season by hurricanes. We’ve seen water damage in Texas. There was wind and water destruction in Florida. Now, in PR, there’s both plus an element of isolation.

 

I just saw a poll that showed only half of Americans know PR is part of the USA. That’s sad commentary on geographical knowledge. And the geography itself doesn’t help now. PR is an island somewhat removed from the lower 48. That means it is harder to get supplies and relief in a timely manner. They are dependant on ships and planes and their supplies are dangerously low.

The article from the Weather Channel, “People are Starting to Die,” and another from the AP, “Puerto Rico Emerges,” illustrate that the time after the storm passes may be the worst for those affected. Please read both very carefully.

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What’s coming out of PR and much of the Caribbean is simply amazing:

 

An entire territory without power.

 

No food on the shelves.

 

No clean drinking water.

 

Hospitals shut down.

 

Clogged streets.

 

No fuel.

 

Communications cut off.

 

No AC in the tropical heat.

 

A setback of 20 to 30 years!

 

People dying in the aftermath.


People panicked and in fear.

 


And any relief is very slow in coming.

 

“The desperate conditions are driving people to “hysteria” said Jose Sanchez Gonzalez, mayor of the northern town of Manati, where a hospital filled to capacity with patients is on the brink of collapse, according to the AP.


“People tell us often, ‘I don’t have my medication, I don’t have my insulin. I don’t have food, I don’t have drinking water,'” Cruz told the Post. “We had 1,260 refugees. Most of them have gone home, and what have they gone home to? Nothing. No electricity, no drinking water. Literally no roof over their head.”

-Weather Channel

 

Horror in the streets.

 

Devastation.

 

The President and various aid efforts are on the way. For many, they will arrive too late. And no-one knows how long this will last; it will be months and months, maybe years and years.

 

The Weather article also has some interesting if terrible info on the USVI and other Caribbean Islands.


“Mercedes Caro shook her head in frustration as she emerged from the SuperMax in the Condado neighborhood of San Juan with a loaf of white bread, cheese and bananas.


“There is no water and practically no food,” she said. “Not even spaghetti.”

-AP article.

 

People are staggering around in shock. Their home state is utterly destroyed. The storm is passed but the real tragedy is setting in – the aftermath will be much worse than the original crisis.


Some despondently describe it like camping. “It’s ‘Survivor’ Puerto Rico,” they say. And they’re right. This is why preppers prep. And there are so many lessons to learn here.

 

Some takeaways:

 

Sometimes you need to evacuate. Bugging out won’t just spare you the brunt of the storm, but also the horror and shock of living in a hellscape. Yes, you have to go back, but you can do so from a position of relative calm and strength.

 

Water, food, medicine, fuel, etc. Supplies, supplies, supplies. The basics count.

 

Know that one disaster can rapidly follow another.

 

Know that you are largely on your own.

 

Learn compassion and do what you can to help others. If nothing else, try to spread the word.

Concurrent with this article I just added a video to FP about ten mistakes preppers make. Consider this story a warning about mistake number 11: not learning from the experiences of others. Even if you’re in an area that will never experience a hurricane, you can still learn and better your plans and preps.

 

Something is always coming and you need to be ready for it. If nothing else, the above is a good indication that you should follow the basics – always. Otherwise you risk joining the unprepared, the panicked, and the victims.

 

Learn, prep, overcome, survive.

Perrin​​ ​​Lovett​​​ ​​​writes​​ ​​about​​ ​​freedom,​​ ​​firearms,​​ ​​and​​ ​​cigars​​ ​​(and​​ ​​everything​​ ​​else)​​ ​​at www.perrinlovett.me​​.​​ ​​He​​ ​​is​​ ​​none​​ ​​too​​ ​​fond​​ ​​of​​ ​​government​​ ​​meddling.

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