Restore that Old Axe to New Splendor

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Restore that Old Axe to New Splendor

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This post has nothing to do with your mother-in-law, if you were wondering.

 

Axes are excellent, ancient tools and weapons. They are the original, EMP-proof power tools. Yet, being metal and subject to necessary abuse, they do wear out and rust up.

Axe-lovers, take heart. There is a way to bring old, worn axes back to life. The Security and Self Reliance site posted a great short on how to recondition an old axe.

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The article is based on finding a nearly free but worn out axe at a yard sale. Such finds happen and are great bargains. However, nothing stops you from using this process on an existing blade.

 

Depending on the shape of the head (condition more than geometric) the axe will need differing levels of maintenance.

 

The grinder is your friend is in really bad condition. If it’s merely dull, use a rasp, file, and stone/belt process to sharpen it up. If it’s covered in rust, worn, and dented, then grind the surfaces down smooth and clean. Be mindful to keep the blade from overheating – use oil/water or time for cooling. Heat leads to loss of strength.

 

After reshaping the axe, use progressively finer grit to work it down and sharpen.

 

Flat primer and enamel will protect the newly reworked axe going forward – for a time.

 

The feature also discusses the ease and availability of refitting new handles. These may be procured for under $7 – standard, 36-inch shafts. They explain insertion, wedging, and gluing. Once the shaft is set, it can be easily cleaned up.

 

At this point you have essentially a new tool!

 

All of this can be accomplished for next to no cost and just about everyone has the skills to do it. All one needs is a few simple tools and a little time. Axes are tough. Thus, it’s really hard to mess up. Feel free to experiment. This may be a new skill you could use (or even sell) after all else rusts way too.

Perrin​​ ​​Lovett​​​ ​​​writes​​ ​​about​​ ​​freedom,​​ ​​firearms,​​ ​​and​​ ​​cigars​​ ​​(and​​ ​​everything​​ ​​else)​​ ​​at www.perrinlovett.me​​.​​ ​​He​​ ​​is​​ ​​none​​ ​​too​​ ​​fond​​ ​​of​​ ​​government​​ ​​meddling.

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