When the Flu Epidemic Becomes a Pandemic

When the Flu Epidemic Becomes a Pandemic

 

It’s flu season and this is one of the worst in modern history. The H3N2 strain is fast spreading and hard hitting.We just ran a video from Fox News on why this particular outbreak is so deadly this year. Click around the App or shift over to FPTV to watch that.

 

And, read this article from article from Trueprepper and Rusty. It’s about how a flu outbreak progresses from just an outbreak to a full-blown pandemic. It’s worth the read if you want to avoid becoming a WHO or CDC statistic.

 

Photo by Research Gate.

 

As for the stats: usually, in a normal year, some 12,000 people DIE from the flu each year in the US. Let that sink in for a second. The elderly, the very young, and those with other conditions are most at risk. But there is some risk to everyone. And that’s all in a “normal” year.

 

This year is not normal – it’s worse. They expect the death toll in 2018 to top 56,000 people. Let THAT sink in. Then, learn and prepare to avoid making it 56,001.

 

Is this a “pandemic?” And what makes for a “pandemic?”

 

“A pandemic, simply put, is a disease outbreak on a global scale. This is different than an epidemic and a simple disease outbreak. An epidemic is when the infectious disease spreads through many people quickly. A disease outbreak is the smallest scale, and can be just one person contracting the disease if it is an unknown disease or one thought to be controlled or eradicated. Flu pandemics are no stranger to our history.”

 

The WHO (World Health Organization) has a handy scale for scoring the outbreaks:

 

It goes from “Phase 1” where animals are affected by humans are not to “Phase 6” where all areas and all people are affected. The Spanish Flu of 1918 comes to mind – 100 million dead across the globe.

 

Please see Rusty’s original for details on each of the six steps.

 

Once the bugs are out and running, there’s nothing you can do to stop them. (No Chief Wiggum, you can’t shoot them). But you can avoid contagion. Rusty also goes into ways you can prevent yourself and those you love from becoming infected. Read those tips. Most of them are super easy and only involve general cleanliness, courtesy, and common sense.

 

He also briefly touches on how to treat a case should you get sick. And he has some good resources for more information.

 

Unlike a sudden event – earthquake or nuclear attack – there is generally a little warning about illness outbreaks and a window of time to try and fight them off.

 

Use this information and make the most of that window. Again, H3, Spanish, or otherwise, we can beat the bug!

 

Perrin​​ ​​Lovett​​​ ​​​writes​​ ​​about​​ ​​freedom,​​ ​​firearms,​​ ​​and​​ ​​cigars​​ ​​(and​​ ​​everything​​ ​​else)​​ ​​at www.perrinlovett.me​​.​​ ​​He​​ ​​is​​ ​​none​​ ​​too​​ ​​fond​​ ​​of​​ ​​government​​ ​​meddling.

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