Posted by on October 5, 2016 11:33 am
Tags: , , , , ,
Categories: Bug Out

Bugging out is hard enough if you’re driving one car through heavy traffic. And it is very hard if the surrounding circumstances are iffy. However navigating two or more vehicles successfully can be a nightmare.

If you drive a convoy to your dedicated location, then planning is critical. If you move your group in multiple vehicles this is something you must consider. Fortunately, someone thought about it for you. You might have never convoyed. However, the military does it daily.

Jordan Jones wrote a comprehensive piece on the subject at the Imminent Threat Solutions site. Please read his article on Applying Military Convoy Techniques to Your Next Adventure.

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Photo by YouTube.

Steps For Planning The Convoy

Pre-Planning and Briefing

First of all, you must plan in advance. This is important, not only so drivers understand where they’re going, but also to minimize events along the way. Jones breaks down the basics:

“OSMEAC”

The military loves acronyms. This one stands for: Orientation, Situation, Mission, Execution, Administration and Logistics, and Communication.

Orientation refers to where the convoy is and where it is going. This encompases the route(s) used.

The Situation is why the convoy is moving in the first place. “There’s a riot in Cleveland, so we’re heading to the hills.”

The Mission refers to the plan of travel. It means getting there and is the object of the whole process.

The plan is Executed by the planned route and the known or expected circumstances along the route. This refers to what it takes to complete the mission.

Administration and Logistics encompases making sure everything is ready to travel. Vehicles are in working order and fueled. All items are packed and ready, etc.

Communication is obvious but extremely important. The entire team must be able to communicate or signal as the trip progresses. This may mean phone or radio conversations or manual signaling.

The “Enemy Course of Action”

Jones calls this the factoring in of Murphy’s Law. It involves planning for the unexpected that may occur along the way. It could mean something as routine as a mechanical problem. Or it could mean an ambush or attack on the convoy.

The team must be ready for anything. Always be prepared.

MPCOA – Most Probable Course Of Action.

This is the planning against the most likely problems. If there is a riot to escape, encountering rioters along the path might be expected. Whatever it is, it must be taken into account.

MDCOA – Most Dangerous Course Of Action.

This is the worst case scenario that can be expected. What if there is a mechanical malfunction while the enemy rioters attack? Everyone must understand in advance how to handle this situation.

Alternative Communication.

If cell towers are unavailable, then alternatives must be known and understood in advance. Even if it is just a series of horn honks or hand signals, have something ready.

Some Encounters That Could Happen

Jones lists a few common problems that may develop and discusses what to do.

  • An interrupting vehicle in the convoy – know how to get around or get rid of the intruder;
  • Loss of contact with a vehicle in the convoy – have a plan to reestablish order;
  • Stopping – if you must stop for a signal or other reason make sure the convoy stays together;
  • Lane Changes – have one vehicle block if necessary to stay together;
  • A Driving Course – Jones discusses the pros and cons of taking a professional offensive driving course. This is a little different, more tactical, than the standard defensive classes most drivers are familiar with.

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Photo by Hallmark Group.

If and when the unexpected happens, all good preppers should have a plan. You need to be flexible enough to cope with whatever happens.

On the road, with multiple vehicles, this can be difficult under normal conditions. Add in the panic of an emergency and perhaps some sabotage and the trip becomes downright tedious. If you decide to move the group, follow these tips in order to ensure safe and successful travel.

Read: These airstream basecamp trailers are a must for when it’s time to get out of Dodge!

Perrin Lovett writes about freedom, firearms, and cigars (and everything else) at www.perrinlovett.me. He is none too fond of government meddling.

One response to Convoy Tips for Your Next Travel Adventure

  1. Tips for Boiling Water in a Disaster - Freedom Prepper October 14th, 2016 at 9:00 am

    […] Related: Tips for your next convoy […]

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